Undergraduate Course Learning Objectives

craftwork (noun): work usually done by hand that exhibits artistry and individuality (Webster’s Dictionary)

A spirit of practical excellence animates the first-year course sequence (English Composition 1, 2, 3) in UCLA’s Writing Programs. These courses position writing as an act of making, an instance of doing, one which requires a keen problem-solving intelligence and a wide-ranging, flexible knowledge of the language. Within this broad remit, our first-year course sequence features reading and writing tasks that increase in length and complexity, while leading students to write with more confidence.

The specific learning outcomes described below are consistent with national disciplinary standards, as outlined by the Council of Writing Program Administrators. These outcomes can be classified under two umbrella categories: principles of making (Craft – Rhetoric, Concepts & Conventions) and methods for doing (Work – Process). This framework reflects the practice-oriented nature of our program and allows our faculty, whose backgrounds and instructional approaches are eclectic, to teach writing in innovative ways.

EC1

EC2

EC3

Process Competencies¹

Develop strategies for generating and revising texts across multiple drafts and gain awareness of your writing process.

Expand strategies for generating and revising texts across multiple drafts, using revision to extend your thinking.

Demonstrate control over strategies for generating and revising texts, using revision to deepen your argument and produce precise, purposeful prose.

Practice using feedback to inform your revision choices.

Give and receive feedback on writing, practice using feedback to make effective revision choices, and reflect on how you use feedback.

Work collaboratively to give and receive sophisticated feedback on writing, and use it to make deliberate, thoughtful revision choices that balance conventions of genre with individual voice.

Rhetorical Competencies

Recognize how audience, purpose, and context shape writing choices (e.g., organization, style, diction) in various texts² and in your own writing.

Understand how audience, purpose, and context shape writing choices (e.g., organization, style, diction), and practice using these choices to target specific audiences and purposes.

Analyze how audience, purpose, and context shape writing choices (e.g., organization, style, diction), and use these choices to address specific audiences and purposes with creativity, flexibility and intention.

Conceptual  Competencies

Develop awareness of writing as a way to generate questions and ideas and to enter into conversation with other texts.

Practice using writing as a way to generate questions and ideas and craft expository texts that synthesize and respond to other texts.

Use writing to craft original, inquiry-driven arguments and responses that synthesize other texts and advance the conversation.

Read critically to understand textual arguments, to understand how writers select appropriate evidence to support claims, and to build arguments that acknowledge other points of view.

Read critically to interpret textual arguments and evaluate sources, practice selecting and interpreting relevant evidence to validate claims, and build arguments that respond to other points of view.

Critically analyze textual arguments, locate and evaluate sources, assess writers’ claims and assumptions, incorporate and interpret effective evidence to validate claims, and use sources to develop compelling lines of inquiry.

Writing Convention Competencies

Gain familiarity with conventions and structures of academic writing and other genres.

Deepen your understanding of conventions and structures of academic writing and other genres.

Analyze conventions and structures of academic writing and other texts/genres.

Practice strategies for gaining control over language, grammar, and syntax in order to produce clear expression of meaning.

Strengthen your control over language, grammar, and syntax in order to produce clear, accurate expression of meaning.

Refine your control over language, grammar, and syntax in order to produce clear, accurate expression of meaning.

¹ The foundation of the writing course, these competencies may resist overt measurement of student gains
² “Texts” throughout this document can refer to written texts, but also multimodal texts.