Courses

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Entry-level | Writing I Requirement | Writing II Requirement | Elective/Upper-Division

Undergraduate Entry-Level Writing Requirement Courses

English Composition 1A: Intermediate Composition for Multilingual Students

This course enrolls multilingual writers whose command of academic English can benefit from intensive work on grammar, syntax and vocabulary. (4 units)

English Composition 1B: High-Intermediate Composition for Multilingual Students

This course serves multilingual writers who can benefit from intensive work in reading and responding to university-level texts. (4 units)

English Composition 1C: Advanced Composition for Multilingual Transfer Students

This course is designed to improve the academic language and study skills of multilingual transfer students who place into it via the English as a Second Language Placement Exam (ESLPE). Emphasis is placed on university-level reading, writing, and research skills. (5 units)

English Composition 1: Introduction to University Discourse

English Composition 1 serves as an essential orientation for students who can benefit from intensive work in reading and responding to university-level texts. (4 units)

English Composition 2: Approaches to University Writing

English Composition 2 engages students in building foundational skills needed for university-level reading and writing tasks. This workshop-style course emphasizes argument, coherence and sentence-level clarity through the revision process. Students continue to build their academic writing skills when they progress to English Composition 3 with a C or better. (5 units)

English Composition 2i: Approaches to University Writing

English Composition 2i enrolls multilingual writers and engages them in building foundational skills needed for university-level reading and writing tasks. This workshop-style course emphasizes argument, coherence and sentence-level clarity through the revision process.  Students attend to the grammar and vocabulary of academic English and practice self-editing strategies. They continue to build their academic writing skills when they progress to English Composition 3 with a C or better. (5 units)


Undergraduate Writing I Requirement Courses

 

English Composition 3: English Composition, Rhetoric and Language

This seminar-style course prepares students to write successfully at the University and beyond. Robust class discussions and challenging reading and writing assignments promote critical thinking, reading, and communication skills to help students succeed at UCLA and be engaged as campus and global citizens. A compelling class theme enables students to develop a strong academic voice, attend to rhetorical concerns, and analyze texts, including expository and creative works that may be in print, digital, visual, or musical form. English Composition 3 meets the College of Letters and Science Writing I requirement with a C or better. (5 units)

English Composition 3D: English Composition, Rhetoric and Language

This seminar-style course prepares students to write successfully at the University and beyond while satisfying the Diversity requirement. Robust class discussions and challenging reading and writing assignments focus in particular on issues of diversity and difference. The course promotes critical thinking, reading, and communication skills to help students succeed at UCLA and be engaged as campus and global citizens. A compelling class theme enables students to develop a strong academic voice, attend to rhetorical concerns, and analyze texts, including expository and creative works that may be in print, digital, visual, or musical form. English Composition 3D meets the College of Letters and Science Diversity requirement and the Writing I requirement with a C or better. (5 units)

English Composition 3DS: English Composition, Rhetoric and Language – Service Learning

This seminar-style course with a service-learning component prepares students to write successfully at the University and beyond while engaging with the Los Angeles community while satisfying the Diversity requirement. Students investigate difference and diversity through writing and rhetoric. In addition, their on-site work enables them to critically examine the structures and institutions that promote asymmetrical power relations as well as the responses of diverse groups to these inequalities. Service learning experiences in the community, robust class discussions and challenging reading and writing assignments promote critical thinking, reading, and communication skills to help students succeed at UCLA and be engaged as campus and global citizens. A compelling class theme enables students to develop a strong academic voice, attend to rhetorical concerns, and analyze texts, including expository and creative works that may be in print, digital, visual, or musical form. English Composition 3DS meets the College of Letters and Science Diversity requirement and the Writing I requirement with a C or better. (5 units)

English Composition 3SL: English Composition, Rhetoric and Language – Service Learning

This seminar-style course with a service-learning component prepares students to write successfully at the University and beyond while engaging with the Los Angeles community. On-site experiences, robust class discussions and challenging reading and writing assignments promote critical thinking, reading, and communication skills to help students succeed at UCLA and be engaged as campus and global citizens. A compelling class theme enables students to develop a strong academic voice, attend to rhetorical concerns, and analyze texts, including expository and creative works that may be in print, digital, visual, or musical form. English Composition 3SL meets the College of Letters and Science Writing I requirement with a C or better. (5 units)


Undergraduate Writing II and GE Courses

English Composition 5W: Literature, Culture, and Critical Inquiry

This course focuses on analysis of literary works within a cultural context to engage students in critical thinking and writing about issues important to academic inquiry and responsible citizenship. Instructors select themes that connect literary texts to larger areas of inquiry. This course encourages students to use writing as a vehicle to explore, as well as demonstrate knowledge of, subject matter. Students who complete this course with a grade of C or better will satisfy the Writing II requirement and earn GE credit under the Literary and Cultural Analysis subset of the Arts and Humanities rubric. (5 units)

English Composition 6W: Language, Culture, and Discourse

This course focuses on the structure and use of English and how it reflects social structure and cultural values. The reading and writing assignments that involve linguistic and socio-linguistic analysis encourage students to use writing as a vehicle to explore, as well as demonstrate knowledge of, subject matter. Students who complete this course with a grade of C or better will satisfy the Writing II requirement and earn GE credit under the Philosophical and Linguistic Analysis rubric. (5 units)


Undergraduate Elective and Upper-Division Courses

ESL 103: Pronunciation for Multilingual Students

This course provides an in-depth understanding of the sound system of English applied to the improvement of a student’s own pronunciation. Individualized feedback is provided through frequent recording assignments and on-line pronunciation resources. (4 units)

ESL 104: Public Speaking for Multilingual Students

This course focuses on making presentations in academic and professional settings and is designed for students who are preparing for graduate school, job interviews, and/or a career. (4 units)

ESL 105: Advanced Grammar and Style for Multilingual Students

This course is designed for students who have completed their ESL writing requirement, but would like to strengthen their ability to self-edit their writing for syntactic accuracy and stylistic variety. (4 units)

ESL 107: Academic Reading and Vocabulary for Multilingual Students

This course provides instruction in and practice of academic reading skills using academic texts. The focus is on improving reading rate and comprehension, expanding academic vocabulary, and developing critical reading skills. (4 units)

ESL 202: Advanced Writing Workshop for International Graduate Students

This course allows multilingual graduate students to work on writing focused on their own academic needs, such as qualifying papers, theses, and dissertations. (4 units)

English Composition 100W: Academic Writing in the Disciplines

English Composition 100W uses a broadly defined theme to help students explore how issues/problems can be explored and presented from varied disciplinary perspectives at the University. Students typically write a research paper on an issue raised in the readings and discussion using an approach that relates to their own discipline. Transfer students often find this course helpful as they transition from community college to UCLA. This course earns Writing II credit. (5 units)

English Composition 131B: Business Writing and Public Policy

This course is a graduation requirement for Economics majors in the Business-Economics concentration. Students explore research on the intersection of economics and social policy; they produce research-based pieces that apply theories to policy issues for varying audiences and purposes. In the process, students refine their written and oral communication skills in a variety of professional contexts, which helps prepare them for today’s job market. (4 units)

English Composition 131C: Medicine and Public Health – Medical Narratives

In this course students examine and write medical narratives as they consider the representation of health and wellness in popular and scholarly sources. Readings from graphic medicine, the medical humanities, fictional and nonfiction essays, podcasts, and case studies provide a common framework for discussion and writing assignments. Topics may include patient and healthcare provider experiences, women’s health, medical illustration, brain injuries, depression, HIV/AIDs, public health, elder care, and comparative medicine. This advanced writing course focuses on the writing process, methods of revision, and the ways students can continue to develop and improve as writers for their professional careers and beyond. (4 units)

English Composition 175: Apprenticeship in Composition Tutoring

This course provides composition Peer Learning Facilitators (PLFs) who work in the Undergraduate Writing Center or on other campus writing initiatives with ongoing mentoring in composition and peer learning methodologies. The course includes an overview of the language, writing and literacy needs of diverse college-aged writers, including developing writers, multilingual writers, and non-native English speaking writers. It provides an opportunity to reflect critically on practical and theoretical frameworks for best-practice tutoring. (2 units, S/U grading)


GRADUATE COURSES

Graduate ESL |ESL TOP Requirement | Writing Pedagogy/Professional Development

Graduate ESL Required Courses

ESL 300: Intermediate Writing and Communication for International Graduate Students (formerly ESL 200)

International graduate students may place into this class via the English as a Second Language Placement Exam (ESLPE). This course is designed to develop the academic reading, writing, language and oral skills of international graduate students. It emphasizes reading comprehension, vocabulary development, and analysis of discipline-specific research articles, with additional work on fundamental composition techniques, grammar and editing. The course also focuses on oral skills such as participating in discussions and making presentations. After taking this course, students must take ESL 201 in order to satisfy the University’s ESL requirement. (4 units)

ESL 301: High-Intermediate Writing and Communication for International Graduate Students (formerly ESL 201)

International graduate students may place into this course via the English as a Second Language Placement Exam (ESLPE) or enroll after successful completion of ESL 200. The course is designed to improve the academic skills of advanced ESL students, using actual graduate-level materials. The course emphasizes the development of academic writing skills with a focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, and composition techniques, with additional work on grammar and editing; graduate-level writing skills such as summarizing and critiquing and other discipline-specific assignments are also emphasized. In addition, students learn and practice effective presentation strategies. (4 units)

ESL 302: Advanced Writing Workshop for International Graduate Students (formerly ESL 202)

This course is designed for international graduate students whose first language is not English to seek writing assistance beyond the courses required to satisfy the University’s ESL requirement. It allows multilingual graduate students to work on writing geared toward their own academic needs, such as qualifying papers, theses, and dissertations. (4 units)


ESL Oral Proficiency Requirement

ESL 310: Pronunciation for International Teaching Assistants (formerly ESL 210)

This course focuses on the accurate articulation of sounds, word stress, linking and other features of fluent spoken English, especially with respect to classroom language and key terms from a participant’s own field. It additionally emphasizes comprehending the fast, casual, and idiomatic speech of undergraduate students. (4 units)

ESL 311: Classroom Communication and Intonation for ITAs I (formerly ESL 211)

This course focuses on stress, rhythm, and intonation in the context of classroom conversation. Course materials are based on video recordings of actual TAs, selected and edited into a series of short video clips of specific teaching events. The videos and transcripts are used as models of the discourse patterns commonly used to introduce a syllabus, explain a visual, field questions, and interact in office hours. (4 units)

ESL 312: Classroom Communication and Intonation for ITAs II (formerly ESL 212)

This course extends the essential skills of ESL 211—stress, rhythm and intonation in the context of classroom conversation. Though the courses are titled I and II, ESL 211 is not a prerequisite for ESL 212. For students who need a longer time and multiple courses to acquire the linguistic competence to serve as a TA, ESL 212 provides models of actual TAs, linguistic support, and structured practice. The classroom contexts in ESL 212 include building rapport with students, giving instructions, encouraging participation, and organizing a lesson effectively. (4 units)

ESL 313: Presentation and Discussion-Leading Skills for ITAs (formerly ESL 213)

This course focuses on communicating effectively as a TA with an emphasis on making technical subject matter accessible to undergraduates. The curriculum is almost entirely performance-based (and class sessions are video-recorded) after Week 2. Students meet in small groups with the instructor to discuss each performance in depth after viewing their video performances outside of class. (4 units)


Writing Pedagogy/Professional Development

English Composition 401: Current Issues in University Writing Pedagogy

English Composition 401 is a Core course option for the Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy. It explores current literature and theories of post-secondary writing pedagogy that includes focus on the changing institutional role of writing instruction, multi-modal composition, and linguistic/educational diversity. (4 units, letter grading)

English Composition 402: Writing Pedagogy Across the Disciplines – Genre and Discourse

English Composition 402 is a Core course option for the Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy. It surveys the literature on academic writing-across-the-curriculum and examines writing conventions, genres, and styles in students’ own academic disciplines, with a focus on evolving academic discourse in emerging and hybrid areas of inquiry. It explores best practices for adapting writing pedagogy to changes in disciplinary academic discourse, with discussion of challenges for multilingual learners. (4 units, letter grading)

English Composition 403: Language Pedagogy – Form, Meaning, and Function

English Composition 403 is a Core course option for the Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy. It surveys the theories and applications of language structures and conventions, with insights from discourse analysis and functional grammar. The course is designed to develop instructors’ ability to explain structures and to articulate language-based issues of meaning by integrating research and successful application of knowledge for effective language-related instruction and feedback. (4 units, letter grading)

Second Language Composition
English Composition 495A: Teaching Preparation Seminar – Second Language Learners (formerly English Comp 495G)

This training course is required of all English as a Second Language (ESL) teaching assistants and open to students seeking a Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy. The course is focused on pedagogical issues specifically related to academic reading and composition skills for second language learners, including course design, assessment of student writing, conferencing, and specialized problems that may occur in teaching English as a Second Language courses. (4 units, S/U grading)

English Composition 495B: Supervised Teaching of Second Language Learners

This mentoring course is required of all ESL teaching assistants each quarter in which they are assigned to teach ESL courses. The course is focused on composition pedagogy, writing course design, assessment of student writing, and specialized problems that may occur in teaching ESL students. (4 units, S/U grading)

First-Year Composition
English Composition 495C: Teaching Preparation Seminar – First Year Composition (formerly English Comp 495B)

This training course is required of all teaching assistants prior to teaching English Composition 3 courses and open to students seeking a Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy. The course is focused on composition pedagogy, writing course design, assessment of student writing, and specialized problems that may occur in teaching English Composition 3. (4 units, S/U grading)

English Composition 495D: Supervised Teaching of First Year Composition (formerly English Comp 495C)

This mentoring course is required in the first quarter of a teaching assistant’s appointment to English Composition 3. It offers continued attention to composition pedagogy, writing course design, assessment of student writing, and specialized problems that may occur in teaching English Composition 3. It may be repeated for credit. (2 units, S/U grading)

Writing-in-the-Disciplines
English Composition 495E: Teaching Preparation Seminar – Writing in the Disciplines (formerly English Comp 495A)

This training course is required of all teaching assistants for Writing II courses not exempt by appropriate departmental/program training and open to students seeking a Graduate Certificate in Writing Pedagogy. The course is focused on composition pedagogy, assessment of student writing, guidance of revision process, and specialized writing problems that may occur in disciplinary contexts. Addition attention is given to practical concerns of creating assignments, marking and grading essays, and conducting peer reviews and conferences. (2 units, S/U grading)

English Composition 495F: Supervised Teaching of Writing in the Disciplines (formerly English Comp 495D)

This mentoring course is required of all teaching assistants for Writing II courses not exempt by appropriate departmental or program training. The course entails mentoring conferences and teaching observations, with focus on student-centered pedagogy, assessment of student writing, guidance of revision process, and specialized writing problems that may occur in disciplinary contexts. The course offers continued attention to practical concerns of creating assignments, marking and grading essays, and conducting peer reviews and conferences. It may be repeated for credit. (2 units, S/U grading)

English Composition M495I: Teaching Preparation Seminar – Writing for Engineers (same as Engineering M495I, formerly English Comp M495E/Engineering M495A)

This training course is required of all teaching assistants for Engineering writing courses not exempt by appropriate departmental or program training. Its focus is on composition pedagogy, assessment of student writing, guidance of revision process, and specialized writing problems that may occur in engineering writing contexts. The course also attends to practical concerns of preparing students to write course assignments, marking and grading essays, and conducting peer reviews and conferences. (2 units, S/U grading)

English Composition M495J: Supervised Teaching of Writing for Engineers (same as Engineering M495J, formerly English Comp M495F/Engineering M495B)

This mentoring course is required of all teaching assistants in their initial term of teaching Engineering writing courses. The course entails mentoring in group and individual meetings and continued focus on composition pedagogy, assessment of student writing, guidance of revision process, and specialized writing problems that may occur in engineering writing contexts. The course continues to attend to practical concerns of preparing students to write course assignments, marking and grading essays, and conducting peer reviews and conferences. (2 units, S/U grading)

Professional Development
English Composition 404: Diversity and Student-Centered Pedagogy

This course surveys the literature on heterogeneous classrooms, with a focus on diversity of race, socio-economic status, geographic background, linguistic skills, and academic preparedness. It explores the development of best practices for accommodating diverse student populations and building active, inclusive curriculum and classroom environments at the university level. (4 units, S/U or letter grading)

English Composition 499: Academic Professionalization Colloquium

This colloquia series and workshop meets for three hours every other week. Rotating speakers present on topics including designing a digital teaching portfolio, drafting the academic/teaching CV, writing application letters for academic jobs, and pursuing alternative academic careers. Each speaker session and panel is followed by a workshop. The course culminates with the revision of an application letter, CV, teaching portfolio, or other relevant document to be determined in consultation with the colloquium organizer. (2 units, S/U grading)